Video Game Review: Monster Hunter Generations - A Wild Trip Through Time - Geek Node

Video Game Review: Monster Hunter Generations – A Wild Trip Through Time

Written by
  • Capcom
  • Capcom
  • Nintendo Distributor South Africa
  • Nintendo Distributor South Africa
  • RPG
  • Single Player, Multiplayer
  • Nintendo 3DS

I’ve always found the Monster Hunter games a little bit strange. While I adore the games’ premise and appreciate what it does, I struggled to stick with the first Monster Hunter game I picked up. Even though the Monster Hunter games are packed with hours upon hours of content, they are definitely better experienced with friends which is why the last release we saw in the West, 4 Ultimate, grew on me once I started playing with friends who are dedicated to the series. Monster Hunter, as a series, is an incredibly sociable experience and while one could go about hunting and crafting, it’s always far nicer to get some buddies together to have your back when you decide to take on an angry Zinogre.

N3DS_MonsterHunterGenerations_Screenshots_(GreatMaccao)_074

Monster Hunter Generations, or X as it is known in Japan, has been a chance for Capcom to build on to last year’s excellent Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate while taking a moment to revisit some of the memorable locations and monsters that have graced Capcom’s long-running series. Even if one might want to think of this as a Greatest Hits collection, Generations does a lot to make the game feel different while staying true to its roots. The core gameplay is all there, you will be finding yourself taking on some scarily large monsters again and again in order to get the best looking gear. Fashion Hunter is alive and well in Generations, but the major draw to this latest entry is easily the new Hunting Styles and Hunter Arts.

At its core, Monster Hunter is a slow and methodical game. This series has never really been about flashy combat spectacles, but rather making sure that hunters are adequately prepared for hunts from everything from choosing the right gear to ensuring that you have the right meal before going out into the field. Everything about Monster Hunter lends itself to the idea of “measure twice, cut once” and the latest additions to the combat are no different. While allowing for a little more flash, the new Hunting Styles and Hunter Arts take nothing away from the core ideals of Monster Hunter. Hunting Styles are essentially what determine your play style and what role you will end up taking on in a hunter. Want to spend most of your time mounting monsters? Well, the Aerial Style is probably for you. Want to be a solid all-rounder? Then you should probably stick to the Hunter Style and play it safe. While the Hunting Styles do take a bit of getting used to and are quite confusing at first, they are definitely a welcome addition to the game and manage to mix things up enjoyably.

N3DS_MonsterHunterGenerations_Screenshots_(HunterArts)_086

Now, while Hunting Styles are going to determine how you’re going to take on the hunt, it’s the Hunter Arts that are going to help you seal the deal. These special moves are able to do everything from deliver powerful attacks to providing support for you and your fellow hunters. While the Hunter Arts that are available to players are determined by their chosen Hunting Styles, they are all well suited for the styles and force players to prepare themselves adequately before heading into hunts. If you were in any way worried that these new additions were going to take away from the core of Monster Hunter you can rest easily knowing that they actually add more to the depth of the game than trivialise the combat. These new additions will be greatly appreciated by veterans as well as newcomers who will all be able to get a kick out of selecting just the right styles and arts and being able to carry out some wonderful new tricks on their hunts.

However, it’s not only the hunters getting some love in Monster Hunter Generations. The trusty Palicoes, a staple of the series, are now playable in the all new Prowler mode. By being able to take control of one of your Paliicoes, you’ll be able to take on special quests designed just for Prowler mode as well as making the gathering aspect of Monster Hunter a little easier. Even though at first players might find Prowler mode very different and controlling Palicoes incredibly contrasting to that of hunters, the incredibly cute nature of the whole ordeal makes it well worth your time. While it’s not completely necessary to sink your time into Prowler mode, it’s well worth the time to get to understand your felyne friends.

N3DS_MonsterHunterGenerations_Screenshots_(Mizutsune)_095

While all the new additions in Monster Hunter Generations do a lot to strengthen the Monster Hunter formula, Generations doesn’t come without any casualties. Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate introduced a pretty solid narrative for the single player portion of the game and, while it wasn’t something to write home about, it unfortunately is sorely lacking in Generations. While the narrative experience has never been a selling point to the series, it was much more interesting than just “go do thing for me new hunter”. All in all, it’s a minor loss for Generations, but it’s nothing to mar the overall experience of the game. Everything else in Generations is distinctly Monster Hunter so long running fans of the series need not worry about anything being taken away from them and newcomers can be certain that they are jumping into an enjoyable experience that has been refined over 12 years.

At the end of the day Monster Hunter Generations is a solid entry in the series that should not be missed. While influential changes to the game have been introduced, they only improve the overall game play and add an extra layer of depth to the already complex world of Monster Hunter. Returning veterans will be able to quickly find their feet and adapt to the world of Generations while newcomers might stumble here and there along the way, but in the end this entry if definitely an worthwhile experience for anyone who owns a 3DS.

N3DS_MonsterHunterGenerations_Screenshots_(Glavenus)_107

I've always found the Monster Hunter games a little bit strange. While I adore the games' premise and appreciate what it does, I struggled to stick with the first Monster Hunter game I picked up. Even though the Monster Hunter games are packed with hours upon hours of content, they are definitely better experienced with friends which is why the last release we saw in the West, 4 Ultimate, grew on me once I started playing with friends who are dedicated to the series. Monster Hunter, as a series, is an incredibly sociable experience and while one could go about hunting and crafting, it's always far nicer to get some buddies together to have your back when you decide to take on an angry Zinogre. Monster Hunter Generations, or X as it is known in Japan, has been a chance for Capcom to build on to last year's excellent Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate while taking a moment to revisit some of the memorable locations and monsters that have graced Capcom's long-running series. Even if one might want to think of this as a Greatest Hits collection, Generations does a lot to make the game feel different while staying true to its roots. The core gameplay is all there, you will be finding yourself taking on some scarily large monsters again and again in order to get the best looking gear. Fashion Hunter is alive and well in Generations, but the major draw to this latest entry is easily the new Hunting Styles and Hunter Arts. At its core, Monster Hunter is a slow and methodical game. This series has never really been about flashy combat spectacles, but rather making sure that hunters are adequately prepared for hunts from everything from choosing the right gear to ensuring that you have the right meal before going out into the field. Everything about Monster Hunter lends itself to the idea of "measure twice, cut once" and the latest additions to the combat are no different. While allowing for a little more flash, the new Hunting Styles and Hunter Arts take nothing away from the core ideals of Monster Hunter. Hunting Styles are essentially what determine your play style and what role you will end up taking on in a hunter. Want to spend most of your time mounting monsters? Well, the Aerial Style is probably for you. Want to be a solid all-rounder? Then you should probably stick to the Hunter Style and play it safe. While the Hunting Styles do take a bit of getting used to and are quite confusing at first, they are definitely a welcome addition to the game and manage to mix things up enjoyably. Now, while Hunting Styles are going to determine how you're going to take on the hunt, it's the Hunter Arts that are going to help you seal the deal. These special moves are able to do everything from deliver powerful attacks to providing support for you and your fellow hunters. While the Hunter…

The only real Big Game Hunter

Score - 7.8

7.8

Total

It's more Monster Hunter goodness with an additional layer of depth to change things up this time around. While the singleplayer campaign might feel lacking compared to last year's iteration, Generations is definitely well worth the time of veterans and newcomers alike with all the additions that have been made to the already solid Monster Hunter formula.

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BiPolarBear

Gaming Author at Geek Node
The best person to offer the worst opinion. Paul's interests include adding 100 hour JRPGs to his backlog and dark walks through dungeons. You'll probably find him rambling on about old man Nintendo or that crazy newfangled eSports thingy.
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