McFarlane Color Tops – SPAWN- Reborn Action Figure – Geek Node

Geeky Goods Review: McFarlane Color Tops – SPAWN- Reborn Action Figure

Written by
  • McFarlane
  • PVC
  • Q4 2016
  • Cosmic Comics
  • http
Darth Zady Bun

Spawning Point

The 90’s saw Image comics splashing onto the scene with characters like Spawn, Team Youngblood and Supreme. Spawn caught my attention as he was a hero who was a messed up agent of hell trying to use his hell-spawned (see what I did there) powers for good. The books also had pictures of scantily clad women. My 9 year old self could not resist.

I would loiter in the toy aisle at our local Checkers and read the Battleaxe Press South African Imprints. How I longed for the day that I would have  R 5.50 to buy comic books! 20 odd years later and I am still lamenting as some folks sell those comics at ridiculous prices.

Anyway, another awesome thing about the 90’s and early 2000’s was the action figure offerings from McFarlane. I personally have had a bitter sweet relationship with the figures.

Don’t get me wrong, the old Spawn figures were awesome. Thinking about them is bitter sweet as I was robbed by a fraudster in the community (a douche bag who thinks he’s Deadpool but behaves like a piece of Deadpool’s stool).

I digress.

For many a collector, the various waves of Spawn figures were our first exposure to the collector world and the platform from which we ascended from “grocery store” figures to “collector grade” figures.

With limited articulation and super detailed sculpts, these action figures were like mini-statues. There’s hardly a collector in South Africa who doesn’t have a few Spawn figures stashed away.

The announcement of  a line of new Spawn figures was met with great excitement. Sadly, comparisons with the older figures is unfortunately inevitable.

I was able to have a look at this figure at Cosmic Comics and would like to send a quick shout out to them for letting me goof around with it.

Since the articulation is basically negligible, I will restrict my evaluation of the figure to the Two A’s (ie Aesthetics and Aish-Factor) for the statue.

AESTHETICS

As highlighted above, the biggest challenge that a figure like this would experience is the inevitable comparisons to the older figures, so I am going to purposefully shy away from such direct comparisons for now.

As is the case with older McFarlane figures, this figure falls somewhere between action figure and statue.

The figure boasts a dramatic pose and a nicely detailed sculpt. The design overall is reminiscent of the classic McFarlane or Capullo art style.

In addition (and as expected, there is also a phenomenal amount of fine detailed sculpting across the figure.

I liked the simulated glowing effect of the eyes with the multi-shaded green paint. However, I was slightly disappointed to note that there were some quality control issues with the paint work elsewhere. I noted some minor slop and uneven finishes across the figure.

It wouldn’t bother me too much, except that in a figure this pricey (in the same price bracket as some statues), you expect better from the manufacturer.

In addition, I felt that while the figure had an imposing look overall as befitting the character, the presence of seam lines in some areas made it look a little… I don’t know… maybe “cheap”.

That being said, the whole is definitely better than the sum of its parts. Provided that you don’t stare at it too long and as harshly as I do, between the dynamic pose and the ornate sculpted details this is undoubtedly a beautiful piece to have.

AISH! – Factor

The figure was surprisingly light (considering its size and the included base). This makes me wonder about its overall build quality.

Out of the box, it definitely lives up to what you would expect in terms of the looks of a Spawn figure.

Yet it seems to be missing something that I simply couldn’t put my finger on. I mean I love the figure and it’s on my “to buy” list – but it just seems like something is off…

It eventually occurred to me that despite my diligent efforts not to draw direct comparisons with older figures, it is essentially impossible to do so. I mean this figure will have to fit into my existing spawn collection so it can’t be seen in a vacuum.

As a result I drew a comparison between a 90’s- early 2000’s Spawn figure to this figure.

I was slightly disappointed that the new figure doesn’t incorporate mixed media elements. In the old days, the chains were actual chains versus the sculpted versions here.

The new chains definitely have more character with their dynamic sculpt. While these look cool, there are few things cooler than having genuine metal chains on a figure.

Overall,  the flaws on this figure are minor niggling ones. The only obstacle it faces from being the “have-to-have” item in its class is the fact that some may feel slightly “cheated”. This is because the new one seems to be missing something that you can’t quite figure out. However, this feeling occurs only if you obsessively compare this figure to older figures by McFarlane.

Realistically speaking, If one can move away from that comparison then this figure is a must have for any Spawn fan.
Notwithstanding the minor issues and possibly dodgy build choices highlighted above, it elicits a hell- spawned “AAiisshh!”

Where to from here?

You can get yourself one of these from Cosmic Comics via:
coolstuff@absamail.co.za or
www.cosmiccomics.co.za or
011 782 0819 (Karryn or Shane)

What did you think?

Got one of these for yourself?
Have a question or two you would like us to answer?
Have suggestions for reviews/ features you would like us to investigate?
Feel free to hit us up and let’s get the dialogue going.

Z

Spawning Point The 90's saw Image comics splashing onto the scene with characters like Spawn, Team Youngblood and Supreme. Spawn caught my attention as he was a hero who was a messed up agent of hell trying to use his hell-spawned (see what I did there) powers for good. The books also had pictures of scantily clad women. My 9 year old self could not resist. I would loiter in the toy aisle at our local Checkers and read the Battleaxe Press South African Imprints. How I longed for the day that I would have  R 5.50 to buy comic books! 20 odd years later and I am still lamenting as some folks sell those comics at ridiculous prices. Anyway, another awesome thing about the 90's and early 2000's was the action figure offerings from McFarlane. I personally have had a bitter sweet relationship with the figures. Don't get me wrong, the old Spawn figures were awesome. Thinking about them is bitter sweet as I was robbed by a fraudster in the community (a douche bag who thinks he's Deadpool but behaves like a piece of Deadpool’s stool). I digress. For many a collector, the various waves of Spawn figures were our first exposure to the collector world and the platform from which we ascended from "grocery store" figures to "collector grade" figures. With limited articulation and super detailed sculpts, these action figures were like mini-statues. There’s hardly a collector in South Africa who doesn’t have a few Spawn figures stashed away. The announcement of  a line of new Spawn figures was met with great excitement. Sadly, comparisons with the older figures is unfortunately inevitable. I was able to have a look at this figure at Cosmic Comics and would like to send a quick shout out to them for letting me goof around with it. Since the articulation is basically negligible, I will restrict my evaluation of the figure to the Two A’s (ie Aesthetics and Aish-Factor) for the statue. AESTHETICS As highlighted above, the biggest challenge that a figure like this would experience is the inevitable comparisons to the older figures, so I am going to purposefully shy away from such direct comparisons for now. As is the case with older McFarlane figures, this figure falls somewhere between action figure and statue. The figure boasts a dramatic pose and a nicely detailed sculpt. The design overall is reminiscent of the classic McFarlane or Capullo art style. In addition (and as expected, there is also a phenomenal amount of fine detailed sculpting across the figure. I liked the simulated glowing effect of the eyes with the multi-shaded green paint. However, I was slightly disappointed to note that there were some quality control issues with the paint work elsewhere. I noted some minor slop and uneven finishes across the figure. It wouldn't bother me too much, except that in a figure this pricey (in the same price bracket as some statues), you expect better from the manufacturer. In addition, I felt that while…

Re-Spawned From Collector Hell

Total - 7.3

7.3

A decent throwback to a lost era of collectible awesomeness. Well worth picking up if you are a Spawn Fan.

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Darth Zady Bun

Darth Zady Bun

Guest Contributor
Zaid is a story teller, traveller, artist, entertainer and comic culture geek of note. Powered by chocolate, and guided by an ever growing bucket (and collectibles) list, he finances his addiction to geek merchandise, comic books, action figures and all the cold cast porcelain and PVC pieces of heaven he can buy by giving (mostly) legal advice. He is also rumoured to have once eaten an entire pack of Marie Biscuits with a single mug of Five Roses Tea. Witnesses deny the incident.
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