Razer Deathadder Elite – The Spartan – Geek Node

Tech Review: Razer Deathadder Elite – The Spartan

Written by
  • Razer
  • 27 September 2016
  • Apex Interactive
  • Rebeltech
  • 6 months ago

I’m going to put it out there: I like Razer’s Deathadder Elite. Everything from the well-sculpted right handed shape, inspired by Microsoft’s Intellimouse Explorer 3.0 – even the sensor accuracy is spot on. I have yet to use a mouse that gelled with my hand quite as well as the Razer Deathadder Elite and yes, I do apologise if I am gushing here, it likely sounds unprofessional of me. Yet I cannot help but find a liking for this mouse. I guess I can’t end the review here though – so let’s get into it.

As a PC gamer who started on the old Microsoft ball mouses, and who progressed into more and more sophisticated pointing devices such as Razer’s Diamondback and Logitech’s G500S – I found the Deathadder Elite the perfect mix of everything I’ve wanted from a mouse, gaming or otherwise. I’ll break it down for you. The clicks on the mouse were soft and responsive. The weighting was was perfect – a good mix of light and heavy. The middle click button was on point, though somewhat firm. The Deathadder’s hand hugging shape reminded me of how well Sony’s Dualshock 4 melded into my palms, the ergonomics worked that well. There was serious research and development that went into this mouse.

The left and right click buttons curved into my fingers, while the scroll wheel was tactile but smooth. Even the sensitivity setting buttons didn’t catch my hand. The rubber thumb grip caught my thumb as soon as I held the mouse, and even the lighting was subtle. The cable the unit we received was a braided nylon type and it came with a rubber strap to keep it in check.

Razer built the outer shell with a fine matte plastic, while the buttons were shiny black. As with all Razer mouses, the top is a single piece, whilst the bottom is two. It felt well put together, with no unnecessary movement between its components. I haven’t felt a light mouse with this kind of solid feel. The backlit scroll wheel and logo at the rear could be customised to your needs. The lighting on the mouse was quite subtle, and in no way interfered with my usage over the week and a half I used it.

There was something simple about the Deathadder Elite, elegant even. When I turned off the lights it was nothing more than a mouse. There was nothing more to it, and this is what endeared me to the Deathadder Elite. The back and forward buttons did as they needed to, once I found my 1800dpi sweet spot, there was no turning back. After playing several first person shooters, point and click adventures games and using it as my primary mouse – I couldn’t fault the device’s performance.

After I configured my sensitivity settings, I decided to customise it a bit in the Razer Synapse software. For the button fiddlers out there – there are independent X and Y settings, acceleration adjustments and sensitivity stages for use while in play. It’s all familiar, since Logitech, Zowie, Steelseries eSports mouses all have these settings to play with. For those who need better customisation Razer does offer a sensor to mouse mat calibration option. Being the archaic old man I am, I still use a 10-year old Razer Mantis Control mouse mat that’s still held up after all the years. Obviously, Synapse wouldn’t have a built-in profile for this one in particular, but did give me a custom option based on my sensitivity. Having used the mouse pre-setup, and post-setup – I couldn’t tell the difference. The Deathadder Elite just worked, and there wasn’t much more one could ask for.

The Synapse software also macro setup which was standard to all its mouse setups. There are also Chrome App options for those wanting to play around with the lighting on the mouse. I didn’t see a use for this feature on the mouse, since its more intended for keyboard users with specific applications running like Photoshop or Fruityloops – with a need to highlight specific keys during use. After looking around, though, I did try out the sound visualiser application, though, and the novelty wore off before long.

I guess that I have to cover some numbers here. The Deathadder Elite’s sensor runs up to mad 16000dpi, and 450 IPS. According to Razer it reaches 5G of acceleration. To me, at least, these are ludicrous numbers. The kind of wrist dexterity required to operate at the mouse’s maximum resolution would tire even the highest sensitivity user’s wrists out in no time. In truth, I found that 1800dpi was more than sufficient – with 3000-5000dpi suitable for higher resolutions. Reading these numbers feels like reading about the performance figures from the latest Ferrari – like a sub 3-second 0-100 launch or massive torque and power output. The fact is that the Deathadder Elite just works no matter what you ask of it.

I’m uncertain what else to say here about the mouse itself. Its functionality is great. The price is higher than some its competition sitting at around R1100. There are higher priced import options like the Zowie EC2 which sit at around R1200. If you’re asking whether this Razer mouse is worth its price – I guess you’re the wrong target market. The Deathadder Elite is a premium mouse intended for a premium market. It’s the same as asking what the fuel consumption of a Porsche GT2 RS is. If you’re in the market for one of these types of mouses, and you want to have the minimalism eSports demands, look no further. I’d reiterate this this though: if it’s out of your price range, you have other options like the Rival or Sensei mouses Steelseries offers, which come in around R150-R400 cheaper. Still, the Deathadder Elite is a great piece of kit despite its high price.

I'm going to put it out there: I like Razer's Deathadder Elite. Everything from the well-sculpted right handed shape, inspired by Microsoft's Intellimouse Explorer 3.0 - even the sensor accuracy is spot on. I have yet to use a mouse that gelled with my hand quite as well as the Razer Deathadder Elite and yes, I do apologise if I am gushing here, it likely sounds unprofessional of me. Yet I cannot help but find a liking for this mouse. I guess I can't end the review here though - so let's get into it. As a PC gamer who started on the old Microsoft ball mouses, and who progressed into more and more sophisticated pointing devices such as Razer's Diamondback and Logitech's G500S - I found the Deathadder Elite the perfect mix of everything I've wanted from a mouse, gaming or otherwise. I'll break it down for you. The clicks on the mouse were soft and responsive. The weighting was was perfect - a good mix of light and heavy. The middle click button was on point, though somewhat firm. The Deathadder's hand hugging shape reminded me of how well Sony's Dualshock 4 melded into my palms, the ergonomics worked that well. There was serious research and development that went into this mouse. The left and right click buttons curved into my fingers, while the scroll wheel was tactile but smooth. Even the sensitivity setting buttons didn't catch my hand. The rubber thumb grip caught my thumb as soon as I held the mouse, and even the lighting was subtle. The cable the unit we received was a braided nylon type and it came with a rubber strap to keep it in check. Razer built the outer shell with a fine matte plastic, while the buttons were shiny black. As with all Razer mouses, the top is a single piece, whilst the bottom is two. It felt well put together, with no unnecessary movement between its components. I haven't felt a light mouse with this kind of solid feel. The backlit scroll wheel and logo at the rear could be customised to your needs. The lighting on the mouse was quite subtle, and in no way interfered with my usage over the week and a half I used it. There was something simple about the Deathadder Elite, elegant even. When I turned off the lights it was nothing more than a mouse. There was nothing more to it, and this is what endeared me to the Deathadder Elite. The back and forward buttons did as they needed to, once I found my 1800dpi sweet spot, there was no turning back. After playing several first person shooters, point and click adventures games and using it as my primary mouse - I couldn't fault the device's performance. After I configured my sensitivity settings, I decided to customise it a bit in the Razer Synapse software. For the button fiddlers out there - there are independent X and Y settings, acceleration adjustments…
Total - 9

9

Despite the high price, the Razer Deathadder Elite is a great mouse if you can affords its premium price tag.

User Rating: 4.85 ( 1 votes)
9

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Gaming / Tech / Entertainment Author at Geek Node
Zubayr could be defined as any one of these traits: Grizzled, optimistic, jaded, blunt, opinionated, irreverent and reserved. His experience was once carbon dated to the glory days of Doom and Duke Nukem 3D. It still amazes him how irrelevant those have become these days.Some say his tears generate DLC unlock codes, and that the WASD combination was discovered by his typo while on Yahoo Chat.
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